CT Procedures

Head

Chest

Extremities

Neck

Cardiac

Angiography

Spine

Abdomen/Pelivs


CT Head

CT scanning of the Head or Brain is typically used to detect bleeding, brain injuries, aneurysms, stroke, fractures, tumors, hydrocephalus, diseases, and or malformations of the skull.  In preparation for this procedure the patient may be asked to remove any metal, hearing aids, and/or removable dental work.  If the procedure is an Enhanced Study it calls for contrast media to be used and further preps may be needed.
            
The patient typically lies on his or her back and their head is placed into a cradle.  Small positioning sponges or Velcro straps may be used to reduce motion and keep the head aligned properly for the scan.  The technologist will center the area being scanned using the laser lights on the scanner.  Shortly after the technologist leaves the room the table will then move through the scanner producing a  “scout” image.  There will be a slight pause while the technologist uses the scout image to set up the exam.  The table will then move through the scanner at least one more time for the examination depending on whether or not contrast media is needed. 
 

 CT Head


CT Sinuses

CT scanning of the Sinuses is typically used to evaluate the sinus cavities for fluid, thickened sinus membranes, planning for surgery, tumors, and to detect any inflammation. In preparation for this procedure the patient may be asked to remove any metal, hearing aids, and/or removable dental work.  If the procedure is an Enhanced Study it calls for contrast media to be used and further preps may be needed.
           
The patient typically lies on his or her back and their head is placed into a cradle.  Depending on what is being evaluated during the procedure the patient may be asked to lie on his or stomach and place their chin on a positioning device.  Small positioning sponges or Velcro straps may be used to reduce motion and keep the head aligned properly for the scan.  The technologist will center the area being scanned using the laser lights on the scanner.  Shortly after the technologist leaves the room the table will then move through the scanner producing a “scout” image.  There will be a slight pause while the technologist uses the scout image to set up the exam.  The table will then move through the scanner at least one more time for the examination depending on whether or not contrast media is needed. 
 

CT Sinuses 

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CT Facial Bones

CT scanning of the Facial bones is typically used to detect bleeding, , fractures, tumors, diseases, and or malformations of the facial bones themselves.  In preparation for this procedure the patient may be asked to remove any metal, hearing aids, and/or removable dental work.  If the procedure is an Enhanced Study it calls for contrast media to be used and further preps may be needed.
           
The patient typically lies on his or her back and their head is placed into a cradle.  Small positioning sponges or Velcro straps may be used to reduce motion and keep the head aligned properly for the scan.  The technologist will center the area being scanned using the laser lights on the scanner.  Shortly after the technologist leaves the room the table will then move through the scanner producing a “scout” image.  There will be a slight pause while the technologist uses the scout image to set up the exam.  The table will then move through the scanner at least one more time for the examination depending on whether or not contrast media is needed.    
 
CT Facial Bones
 

CT IAC's / Temporal Bones

CT scanning of the IAC’s or Temporal Bones are typically used to evaluate the outer ear, bones of the ear, and inner ear structures for infections, injury, tumors, or hearing disorders.  In preparation for this procedure the patient may be asked to remove any metal, hearing aids, and/or removable dental work.  If the procedure is an Enhanced Study it calls for contrast media to be used and further preps may be needed.
           
The patient typically lies on his or her back and their head is placed into a cradle.  Depending on what is being evaluated during the procedure the patient may be asked to lie on his or stomach and place their chin on a positioning device.  Small positioning sponges or Velcro straps may be used to reduce motion and keep the head aligned properly for the scan.  The technologist will center the area being scanned using the laser lights on the scanner.  Shortly after the technologist leaves the room the table will then move through the scanner producing a “scout” image.  There will be a slight pause while the technologist uses the scout image to set up the exam.  The table will then move through the scanner at least one more time for the examination depending on whether or not contrast media is needed. 
 
CT Temporal Bones
 

CT Chest

CT scanning of the Chest is typically used to evaluate abnormalities found on conventional chest X-rays or in diagnosing clinical symptoms of coughing, chest pain, fever, or trauma.  CT scans of the chest may also evaluate for Pulmonary Embolisms (Blood Clots), tumors, and lung nodules.  In preparation for this procedure the patient may be asked to remove any metal and change into a gown.  If the procedure is an Enhanced Study it calls for contrast media to be used and further preps may be needed.
          
The patient typically lies on his or her back with their feet facing the scanner.  Positioning sponges may be placed under the knees for comfort and to assist in aligning the body for the scan.  If possible the patient will be asked to raise their arms above their head.  The technologist will center the area being scanned using the laser lights on the scanner.  Shortly after the technologist leaves the room, a recorded voice will request the patient to hold their breath.  At this point the table will then move through the scanner producing a “scout” image, and the patient will be instructed to breathe normally.  There will be a slight pause while the technologist uses the scout image to set up the exam.  The table will then move through the scanner at least one more time for the examination depending on whether or not contrast media is needed.  
 
CT Chest
 

 CT Upper Extremity

A CT scan of the Upper Extremities is typically used to evaluate abnormalities found within the soft tissue and bony anatomy of that extremity.  CT scans of this nature assess the muscles, bones, joints, and soft tissues for arthritis, fractures, tumors, bleeding, and inflammation.  In preparation for this procedure the patient may be asked to remove any metal and change into a gown.  If the procedure is an Enhanced Study it calls for contrast media to be used and further preps may be needed.

The patient typically lies on his or her back.  Small positioning sponges or Velcro straps may be used to reduce motion and keep the Extremity being imaged aligned properly for the scan.  The technologist will center the area being scanned using the laser lights on the scanner.  Shortly after the technologist leaves the room, the table will move through the scanner producing a “scout” image.  There will be a slight pause while the technologist uses the scout image to set up the exam.  The table will then move through the scanner at least once more depending on whether or not contrast dye is being used.
CT Upper Extremity
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CT Lower Extremity

A CT scan of the Lower Extremities is typically used to evaluate abnormalities found within the soft tissue and bony anatomy of that extremity.  CT scans of this nature assess the muscles, bones, joints, and soft tissues for arthritis, fractures, tumors, bleeding, and inflammation.  In preparation for this procedure the patient may be asked to remove any metal and change into a gown.  If the procedure is an Enhanced Study it calls for contrast media to be used and further preps may be needed.

The patient typically lies on his or her back.  Small positioning sponges or Velcro straps may be used to reduce motion and keep the Extremity being imaged aligned properly for the scan.  The technologist will center the area being scanned using the laser lights on the scanner.  Shortly after the technologist leaves the room, the table will move through the scanner producing a “scout” image.  There will be a slight pause while the technologist uses the scout image to set up the exam.  The table will then move through the scanner at least once more depending on whether or not contrast dye is being used.
CT Lower Extremity

CT Soft Tissue Neck

A CT Soft Tissue Neck is typically ordered to evaluate the soft tissues and organs of the neck.  Capturing images of all anatomy including the tonsils, adenoids, airways, thyroid, glands, and the blood vessels: evaluating for tumors, masses, and or swelling. In preparation for this procedure the patient may be asked to remove any metal, hearing aids, and/or removable dental work.  If the procedure is an Enhanced Study it calls for contrast media to be used and further preps may be needed.
The patient typically lies on his or her back and their head is placed into a cradle.  Small positioning sponges or Velcro straps may be used to reduce motion and keep the head aligned properly for the scan.  The technologist will center the area being scanned using the laser lights on the scanner.  Shortly after the technologist leaves the room the table will then move through the scanner producing a “scout” image.  There will be a slight pause while the technologist uses the scout image to set up the exam.  The table will then move through the scanner at least one more time for the examination depending on whether or not contrast media is needed.  The technologist may ask you to withhold from swallowing during the scan to reduce motion and will inform you when it is ok to resume normal swallowing activities.
 
CT Soft Tissue Neck
 
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CT Cardiac Score

UPHSM is proud to be one of the Nation’s Top 50 Cardiovascular Hospitals.  Some of the newest technology, including the Siemens Somatom Definition CT Scanner, makes cardiac imaging easier and safer for our patients.  This scanner is classified as a dual-source CT scanner, which uses two sources and two detectors at the same time during the procedure.  This technology reduces the scan time with about 50% less radiation exposure than a traditional CT scanner, and yet provides full cardiac detail of the beating heart. 
 
Cardiac Scoring in CT is used to evaluate for a condition called Coronary Artery Disease.  Major risk factors for Coronary Artery Disease include but are not limited to diabetes, smoking, high blood pressure, high blood cholesterol, and obesity.  In preparation for this procedure the patient may be asked to remove any metal and change into a gown.  If you are a smoker or drink large amounts of caffeine you may be asked to withhold from doing so a few hours prior to your exam.  A complete prep will be provided by your ordering physician. 
           
The patient typically lies on his or her back with their feet facing the scanner.  Positioning sponges may be placed under the knees for comfort and to assist in aligning the body for the scan.  If possible the patient will be asked to raise their arms above their head.  A set of electrodes will be placed on the patient’s chest connecting them to an ECG (electrocardiograph) machine which records the electrical activity of the heart.  The technologist will center the area being scanned using the laser lights on the scanner.  Shortly after the technologist leaves the room, a recorded voice will request the patient to take a shallow breath in and hold it.  At this point the table will then move through the scanner producing a “scout” image, and the patient will be instructed to breathe normally.  There will be a slight pause while the technologist uses the scout image to set up the exam.  The table will then move through the scanner at least one more time for the examination and the request to suspend breathing will be announced again.    
 
CT Cardiac Score

CT Heart Angiography

UPHSM is proud to be one of the Nation’s Top 50 Cardiovascular Hospitals.  Some of the newest technology, including the Siemens Somatom Definition CT Scanner, makes cardiac imaging easier and safer for our patients.  This scanner is classified as a dual-source CT scanner, which uses two sources and two detectors at the same time during the procedure.  This technology reduces the scan time with about 50% less radiation exposure than a traditional CT scanner, and yet provides full cardiac detail of the beating heart.         
 
CT Heart Angiography is commonly used to evaluate for a condition called Coronary Artery Disease.  Major risk factors for Coronary Artery Disease include but are not limited to diabetes, smoking, high blood pressure, high blood cholesterol, and obesity.  During this procedure the Heart, Cardiac blood vessels and circulation, and great vessels are imaged in both high resolution and 3-Dimensionally as the heart beats.  In preparation for this procedure the patient may be asked to remove any metal and change into a gown.  If you are a smoker or drink large amounts of caffeine you may be asked to withhold from doing so a few hours prior to your exam.  A complete prep will be provided by your ordering physician. 
           
The patient typically lies on his or her back with their feet facing the scanner.  Positioning sponges may be placed under the knees for comfort and to assist in aligning the body for the scan.  The technologist will place an Intravenous (IV) Catheter in the patient’s arm.  Note: this procedure is an Enhanced Study and calls for IV contrast to be used.  If you are allergic, diabetic, or experiencing lower kidney functions inform the ordering physician and the technologist.

After the IV access is established, a set of electrodes will be placed on the patient’s chest connecting them to an ECG (electrocardiograph) machine which records the electrical activity of the heart.  If possible the patient will be asked to raise their arms above their head.  The technologist will center the area being scanned using the laser lights on the scanner.  Shortly after the technologist leaves the room, a recorded voice will request the patient to take a shallow breath in and hold it.  At this point the table will then move through the scanner producing a “scout” image, and the patient will be instructed to breathe normally.  There will be a slight pause while the technologist uses the scout image to set up the exam.  A medication that slows or stabilizes the patient’s heart may be used to increase the diagnostic value of the images.  The table will then move through the scanner at least one more time for the examination and the request to suspend breathing will be announced again.  
 
CT Heart  Angiography

CT Angiography Head / Circle of Willis

CT Angiography of the head is typically used to evaluate abnormalities found within the blood vessels that run through the brain.  CT scans of this nature assess the arteries and veins for plaque, atherosclerosis, dissections, and aneurysms.  In preparation for this procedure the patient may be asked to remove any metal and change into a gown.  This procedure is an Enhanced Study meaning it calls for contrast media to be used.  Further preps may be needed and should be provided by the ordering physician.  If you are allergic to IV contrast, diabetic, or experiencing lower kidney functions inform the ordering physician and the technologist.

The patient typically lies on his or her back and their head is placed into a cradle.  Small positioning sponges or Velcro straps may be used to reduce motion and keep the head and neck aligned properly for the scan.  The technologist will place an Intravenous (IV) Catheter in the patient’s arm.  Note: this procedure is an Enhanced Study and calls for IV contrast to be used.  The technologist will center the area being scanned using the laser lights on the scanner.  Shortly after the technologist leaves the room, the table will move through the scanner producing a “scout” image.  There will be a slight pause while the technologist uses the scout image to set up the exam.  The table will then move through the scanner at least two additional times.
CT Angiography Head Circle of Wills

CT Angiography Neck (Carotids)

CT Angiography of the Neck is typically used to evaluate abnormalities found within the blood vessels that run through that portion of the body.  CT scans of this nature assess the arteries and veins for plaque, atherosclerosis, dissections, and aneurysms.  In preparation for this procedure the patient may be asked to remove any metal and change into a gown.  This procedure is an Enhanced Study meaning it calls for contrast media to be used.  Further preps may be needed and should be provided by the ordering physician.  If you are allergic to IV contrast, diabetic, or experiencing lower kidney functions inform the ordering physician and the technologist.

The patient typically lies on his or her back and their head is placed into a cradle.  Small positioning sponges or Velcro straps may be used to reduce motion and keep the head and neck aligned properly for the scan.  The technologist will place an Intravenous (IV) Catheter in the patient’s arm.  Note: this procedure is and Enhanced Study and calls for IV contrast to be used.  The technologist will center the area being scanned using the laser lights on the scanner.  Shortly after the technologist leaves the room, the table will move through the scanner producing a “scout” image.  There will be a slight pause while the technologist uses the scout image to set up the exam.  The table will then move through the scanner at least two additional times.
CT Angiography Neck

CT Angiography Chest

CT Angiography of the chest is typically used to evaluate abnormalities found within the blood vessels that run through that portion of the body.  CT scans of this nature assess the arteries and veins for plaque, atherosclerosis, dissections, and aneurysms.  In preparation for this procedure the patient may be asked to remove any metal and change into a gown.  This procedure is an Enhanced Study meaning it calls for contrast media to be used.  Further preps may be needed and should be provided by the ordering physician.  If you are allergic to IV contrast, diabetic, or experiencing lower kidney functions inform the ordering physician and the technologist.

The patient typically lies on his or her back with their feet facing the scanner.  Positioning sponges may be placed under the knees for comfort and to assist in aligning the body for the scan. The technologist will place an Intravenous (IV) Catheter in the patient’s arm.  Note: this procedure is an Enhanced Study and calls for IV contrast to be used.  If possible the patient will be asked to raise their arms above their head.  The technologist will center the area being scanned using the laser lights on the scanner.  Shortly after the technologist leaves the room, a recorded voice will request the patient to hold their breath.  At this point the table will then move through the scanner producing a “scout” image, and the patient will be instructed to breathe normally.  There will be a slight pause while the technologist uses the scout image to set up the exam.  The table will then move through the scanner at least two additional times.
CT Angiography Chest

CT Angiography Abdomen / Pelvis

CT Angiography of the Abdomen, Pelvis, or a combination of the two is typically used to evaluate abnormalities found within the blood vessels that run through that portion of the body.  CT scans of this nature assess the arteries and veins for plaque, atherosclerosis, dissections, and aneurysms.  In preparation for this procedure the patient may be asked to remove any metal and change into a gown.  This procedure is an Enhanced Study meaning it calls for contrast media to be used.  Further preps may be needed and should be provided by the ordering physician.  If you are allergic to IV contrast, diabetic, or experiencing lower kidney functions inform the ordering physician and the technologist.

The patient typically lies on his or her back with their feet facing the scanner.  Positioning sponges may be placed under the knees for comfort and to assist in aligning the body for the scan. The technologist will place an Intravenous (IV) Catheter in the patient’s arm.  Note: this procedure is an Enhanced Study and calls for IV contrast to be used.  If possible the patient will be asked to raise their arms above their head.  The technologist will center the area being scanned using the laser lights on the scanner.  Shortly after the technologist leaves the room, a recorded voice will request the patient to hold their breath.  At this point the table will then move through the scanner producing a “scout” image, and the patient will be instructed to breathe normally.  There will be a slight pause while the technologist uses the scout image to set up the exam.  The table will then move through the scanner at least two additional times.
CT Angiography Adbomen Pelvis

CT Angiography Extremities

CT Angiography of the Extremities is typically used to evaluate abnormalities found within the blood vessels that run through that portion of the body.  CT scans of this nature assess the arteries and veins for plaque, atherosclerosis, dissections, and aneurysms.  In preparation for this procedure the patient may be asked to remove any metal and change into a gown.  This procedure is an Enhanced Study meaning it calls for contrast media to be used.  Further preps may be needed and should be provided by the ordering physician.  If you are allergic to IV contrast, diabetic, or experiencing lower kidney functions inform the ordering physician and the technologist.

The patient typically lies on his or her back.  Small positioning sponges or Velcro straps may be used to reduce motion and keep the Extremity being imaged aligned properly for the scan.  The technologist will place an Intravenous (IV) Catheter in the patient’s arm.  Note: this procedure is an Enhanced Study and calls for IV contrast to be used.  The technologist will center the area being scanned using the laser lights on the scanner.  Shortly after the technologist leaves the room, the table will move through the scanner producing a “scout” image.  There will be a slight pause while the technologist uses the scout image to set up the exam.  The table will then move through the scanner at least two additional times.
CT Angiography Extremities

CT Cervical Spine

CT scanning of the Cervical Spine is typically used to evaluate the spine before and after surgery, detect various types of tumors, diseases, fractures, spinal stenosis, disc herniations, and or any malformations.  In preparation for this procedure the patient may be asked to remove any metal, hearing aids, and/or removable dental work.  If the procedure is an Enhanced Study it calls for contrast media to be used and further preps may be needed.
           
The patient typically lies on his or her back and their head is placed into a cradle.  Small positioning sponges or Velcro straps may be used to reduce motion and keep the head and neck aligned properly for the scan.  The technologist will center the area being scanned using the laser lights on the scanner.  Shortly after the technologist leaves the room the table will then move through the scanner producing a “scout” image.  There will be a slight pause while the technologist uses the scout image to set up the exam.  The table will then move through the scanner at least one more time for the examination depending on whether or not contrast media is needed.  
 
CT Cervical Spine
 

CT Thoracic Spine

CT scanning of the Thoracic or Dorsal Spine is typically used to evaluate the spine before and after surgery, detect various types of tumors, diseases, fractures, spinal stenosis, disc herniations, and or any malformations.  In preparation for this procedure the patient may be asked to remove any metal, hearing aids, and/or removable dental work.  If the procedure is an Enhanced Study it calls for contrast media to be used and further preps may be needed.
           
The patient typically lies on his or her back with their feet facing the scanner.  Positioning sponges may be placed under the knees for comfort and to assist in aligning the spine for the scan.  If possible the patient will be asked to raise their arms above their head.  The technologist will center the area being scanned using the laser lights on the scanner.  Shortly after the technologist leaves the room the table will then move through the scanner producing a “scout” image.  There will be a slight pause while the technologist uses the scout image to set up the exam.  The table will then move through the scanner at least one more time for the examination depending on whether or not contrast media is needed.  
 
CT Thoracic Spine

CT Lunbar Sacral Spine

CT scanning of the Lumbar Sacral Spine is typically used to evaluate the spine before and after surgery, detect various types of tumors, diseases, fractures, spinal stenosis, disc herniations, and or any malformations.  In preparation for this procedure the patient may be asked to remove any metal, hearing aids, and/or removable dental work.  If the procedure is an Enhanced Study it calls for contrast media to be used and further preps may be needed.
           
The patient typically lies on his or her back with their feet facing the scanner.  Positioning sponges may be placed under the knees for comfort and to assist in aligning the spine for the scan.  If possible the patient will be asked to raise their arms above their head.  The technologist will center the area being scanned using the laser lights on the scanner.  Shortly after the technologist leaves the room the table will then move through the scanner producing a “scout” image.  There will be a slight pause while the technologist uses the scout image to set up the exam.  The table will then move through the scanner at least one more time for the examination depending on whether or not contrast media is needed.    
 
CT Lumbar Sacral Spine

CT Myelogram

CT scanning involving the diagnostic tool of Myelography is used to evaluate both the bony structure of the spine as well as the nerve structures.  In preparation for this procedure the patient may be asked to remove any metal, hearing aids, and/or removable dental work.  This procedure requires the patient to follow a few preps that will be provided by your ordering physician. 

This procedure requires two parts.  During the first portion of this procedure the patient will have Contrast dye injected into his or her cerebral spinal fluid which coats the spinal canal.  The contrast dye will coat the spinal canal, the spinal cord, and the nerve roots, which will illuminate any malformations in the spine during the scan.  The patient will then be transferred to the CT table where they will be asked to lie on his or her back for the second portion of this procedure.  Positioning sponges and Velcro may be used to reduce motion and aligning the spine for the scan.  The technologist will center the area being scanned using the laser lights on the scanner.  Shortly after the technologist leaves the room the table will then move through the scanner producing a “scout” image.  There will be a slight pause while the technologist uses the scout image to set up the exam.  The table will then move through the scanner at least one more time for the examination.  Patients are not permitted to drive immediately following this procedure and will need to make arrangements for transportation home.  
 
CT Myelogram

CT Abdomen and Pelvis

CT scans of the Abdomen, Pelvis, or a combination of the two are typically used to evaluate abnormalities found within the organs of the abdominopelvic cavity.  CT scans of this nature assess the liver, urinary tract, spleen, intestines, and vasculature for multiple diseases and or infections.  In preparation for this procedure the patient may be asked to remove any metal and change into a gown.  If the procedure is an Enhanced Study it calls for contrast media to be used and further preps may be needed.
           
The patient typically lies on his or her back with their feet facing the scanner.  Positioning sponges may be placed under the knees for comfort and to assist in aligning the body for the scan.  If possible the patient will be asked to raise their arms above their head.  The technologist will center the area being scanned using the laser lights on the scanner.  Shortly after the technologist leaves the room, a recorded voice will request the patient to hold their breath.  At this point the table will then move through the scanner producing a “scout” image, and the patient will be instructed to breathe normally.  There will be a slight pause while the technologist uses the scout image to set up the exam.  The table will then move through the scanner at least one more time for the examination depending on whether or not contrast media is needed. 
 
CT Abdomen and Pelvis
 

CT Enterocolysis

The CT Scan of the Abdomen using an Enterocolysis technique is typically used to evaluate abnormalities found within the small bowel of the abdomen such as Crohn’s Disease.  In preparation for this procedure the patient may be asked to remove any metal and change into a gown.  This procedure is an Enhanced Study meaning it calls for contrast media to be used.   Further preps may be needed and should be provided by the ordering physician.  If you are allergic to IV contrast, diabetic, or experiencing lower kidney functions inform the ordering physician and the technologist.
           
The patient may be asked to drink an oral form of contrast prior to the scan in order to fill the stomach and small intestines.  During the scan the patient typically lies on his or her back with their feet facing the scanner.  Positioning sponges may be placed under the knees for comfort and to assist in aligning the body for the scan.  The technologist will place an Intravenous (IV) Catheter in the patient’s arm.  Note: this procedure is and Enhanced Study and calls for IV contrast to be used.   If possible the patient will be asked to raise their arms above their head.  The technologist will center the area being scanned using the laser lights on the scanner.  Shortly after the technologist leaves the room, a recorded voice will request the patient to hold their breath.  At this point the table will then move through the scanner producing a “scout” image, and the patient will be instructed to breathe normally.  There will be a slight pause while the technologist uses the scout image to set up the exam.  The table will then move through the scanner a total of three more times, twice as the IV Contrast is being injected.  
 
CT Enterocolysis
 

CT Liver Protocol

The CT Scan of the Abdomen using a Liver Protocol is typically used to evaluate abnormalities found within the Liver and Hepatic System.  CT scans of this nature assess for liver tumors, bleeding, jaundice, and liver diseases.  In preparation for this procedure the patient may be asked to remove any metal and change into a gown.  This procedure is an Enhanced Study meaning it calls for contrast media to be used.   Further preps may be needed and should be provided by the ordering physician.  If you are allergic to IV contrast, diabetic, or experiencing lower kidney functions inform the ordering physician and the technologist.
           
The patient may be asked to drink an oral form of the IV Contrast prior to the scan in order to fill the stomach and small intestines.  During the scan the patient typically lies on his or her back with their feet facing the scanner.  Positioning sponges may be placed under the knees for comfort and to assist in aligning the body for the scan.  The technologist will place an Intravenous (IV) Catheter in the patient’s arm.  Note: this procedure is an Enhanced Study and calls for IV contrast to be used.   If possible the patient will be asked to raise their arms above their head.  The technologist will center the area being scanned using the laser lights on the scanner.  Shortly after the technologist leaves the room, a recorded voice will request the patient to hold their breath.  At this point the table will then move through the scanner producing a “scout” image, and the patient will be instructed to breathe normally.  There will be a slight pause while the technologist uses the scout image to set up the exam.  The table will then move through the scanner several times as the IV Contrast is injected.  This catches the liver in multiple stages of enhancement which aids with the diagnosis. 
 
CT Liver Protocol
 

CT Pancreatic Protocol

The CT Scan of the Abdomen using a Pancreatic Protocol is typically used to evaluate abnormalities found within the Pancreas.  CT scans of this nature assess for tumors and Pancreatitis, or inflammation of the pancreas.  In preparation for this procedure the patient may be asked to remove any metal and change into a gown.  This procedure is an Enhanced Study meaning it calls for contrast media to be used.   Further preps may be needed and should be provided by the ordering physician.  If you are allergic to IV contrast, diabetic, or experiencing lower kidney functions inform the ordering physician and the technologist.
           
The patient may be asked to drink an oral contrast prior to the scan in order to fill the stomach and small intestines.  During the scan the patient typically lies on his or her back with their feet facing the scanner.  Positioning sponges may be placed under the knees for comfort and to assist in aligning the body for the scan.  The technologist will place an Intravenous (IV) Catheter in the patient’s arm.  Note: this procedure is an Enhanced Study and calls for IV contrast to be used.   If possible the patient will be asked to raise their arms above their head.  The technologist will center the area being scanned using the laser lights on the scanner.  Shortly after the technologist leaves the room, a recorded voice will request the patient to hold their breath.  At this point the table will then move through the scanner producing a “scout” image, and the patient will be instructed to breathe normally.  There will be a slight pause while the technologist uses the scout image to set up the exam.  The table will then move through the scanner several times as the IV Contrast is injected.  This catches the pancreas in multiple stages of enhancement which aids with the diagnosis. 
 
CT Pancreatic Protocol

CT Urogram

A CT Urogram is typically used to evaluate abnormalities found within the Urinary System.  CT scans of this nature assess the kidneys, ureters, and bladder for blockages, kidney stones, infections, growths, and other diseases.  In preparation for this procedure the patient may be asked to remove any metal and change into a gown.  This procedure is an Enhanced Study meaning it calls for contrast media to be used.   Further preps may be needed and should be provided by the ordering physician.  If you are allergic to IV contrast, diabetic, or experiencing lower kidney functions inform the ordering physician and the technologist.

The patient typically lies on his or her back with their feet facing the scanner.  Positioning sponges may be placed under the knees for comfort and to assist in aligning the body for the scan.  The technologist will place an Intravenous (IV) Catheter in the patient’s arm.  Note: this procedure is an Enhanced Study and calls for IV contrast to be used.   If possible the patient will be asked to raise their arms above their head.  The technologist will center the area being scanned using the laser lights on the scanner.  Shortly after the technologist leaves the room, a recorded voice will request the patient to hold their breath.  At this point the table will then move through the scanner producing a “scout” image, and the patient will be instructed to breathe normally.  There will be a slight pause while the technologist uses the scout image to set up the exam.  The table will then move through the scanner as the IV Contrast is being injected.  Once that portion of the scan in completed the technologist will assist the patient in relaxing his or her arms at their side.  The patient will have to wait a total of ten minutes at this point in order to allow the IV Contrast to fill the Urinary Tract. 

After the ten minute mark, the patient will be asked to raise their arms for another scan.  If the urinary tract is filled with contrast the scan is complete, if not, the patient will be asked to lay prone (on their abdomen) for another scan to evaluate the Urinary System.
CT Urogram