Diabetes Types


Pre Diabetes

Pre diabetes is a condition in which the blood sugar level is higher than normal but not quite high enough to be diagnosed with diabetes. You may also hear the term impaired glucose tolerance or borderline diabetes used. Pre diabetes is the correct term.

Approximately 21% of the population has pre diabetes. If steps are not taken to reduce the modifiable risk factors the chances of pre diabetes progressing quickly to diabetes is very high.

Treatment for pre diabetes

Studies have shown that making healthy diet changes and increasing activity can decrease your chances of developing diabetes.

 

 Pre Diabetes

Diet -
Decreasing total calories eaten is the key to weight loss. The best place to start is by eliminating or reducing portions of empty calorie foods. Focus on whole grains, fruits, vegetables, and lean meats. Also add small amounts of healthy fats into your diet like, olive oil, peanut butter, nuts, and avocados.

 

Empty calorie foods:
Regular Pop
Candy
Desserts
Potato Chips
Alcohol
 
Many foods do affect your blood sugar, those foods are called, carbohydrates. It is not necessary to avoid all carbohydrates to control the blood sugar, some carbohydrates are essential in a healthy diet. Speaking with a Registered Dietitian is the best way to find a diet that works for you and your health!


Exercise -

MOVE MORE!
Increasing your activity helps decrease insulin resistance in the cells which is one of the main problems in pre diabetes and type 2 diabetes. Aim for 30 minutes of cardiovascular activity most days of the week. The main key to staying active is finding something you are able to stick with through the winter months.

 

UP Health System - Marquette has many great 'indoor' exercise opportunities - call diabetes education at 906-225-3221 or 1-800-225-3221 ext. 3221 for more information or see the links below.

 

Check with your doctor before beginning an exercise program

Type 1 Diabetes

Type 1 diabetes is usually diagnosed in children and young adults - but can happen at any age. It is a disease in which the body stops producing insulin. Insulin is a hormone, made by the pancreas, that is needed to move sugar (glucose) out of the bloodstream and into the cells for energy.

Type 1 diabetes can happen suddenly. If you are experiencing unexplained weight loss, frequent thirst and urination, and nausea or vomiting, it is important that you seek medical attention.

Treatment for type 1 diabetes always includes insulin. It is necessary to replace the missing hormone to successfully manage this disease. Type 1 diabetes can be very scary and is serious - but wonderful tools are available to help you live a long, healthy, and happy life.

Whether you are newly diagnosed with type 1 diabetes or have had it for many years, meeting with a Certified Diabetes Educator can help get you on the right track. Our team has up to date knowledge on all of the therapies available to assist you in achieving your blood sugar goals. We also offer continuous blood sugar monitoring; this 72 hour study gives you and your physician valuable information about what your blood sugar is doing in between fingerstick testing. Call 225-3221 to set up an appointment.

Movie - A basic definition of type 1 diabetes. (27 seconds)
Insulin: The Movie
Describes how the body breaks food into sugar and uses sugar as a source of energy (51 sec)


 Type 2 Diabetes

Type 2 diabetes is the most common type of diabetes. It can occur at any age but is most common after age 40. In most cases, type 2 diabetes can be prevented or reversed by making lifestyle changes.

In type 2 diabetes the blood sugar rises because the body is not efficiently using the hormone insulin, or is not producing enough insulin. Insulin is a hormone, made by the pancreas, that is needed to move sugar (glucose) out of the bloodstream and into the cells for energy.

Risk factors for type 2 diabetes:
- family history of type 2 diabetes
- inactive lifestyle
- over 40 years of age
- obesity
- a history of gestational diabetes or delivering a baby weighing over 9 lbs
- high-risk ethnic group (African-American, Hispanic, Native American)

 

Type 2 diabetes can progress slowly with sometimes no symptoms. Complications of the disease can begin before you even know you have it. That is why yearly check-ups with your doctor are important.

Treatment of type 2 diabetes includes - healthy eating, exercise, and possibly medication. This is a lifelong condition with the treatment changing over time. By making lifestyle changes the risk of complications decreases significantly and it is possible to live a long, healthy life.

Whether you are newly diagnosed with type 2 diabetes or have had it for many years, meeting with a Certified Diabetes Educator can help get you on the right track. Our team has up to date knowledge on all of the therapies available to assist you in achieving your blood sugar goals. We offer individual and group education and topics can be tailored to meet your specific needs. Now available, with physician order, is the iPro Continuous Blood Sugar Monitor. The monitor is worn for 72 hours and measures the blood sugar every 5 minutes – this information can help your healthcare team make the best treatment recommendations. Call 225-3221 for more information or to schedule an education appointment.